1. GENERAL

JOMR conveys scientific progress in the field of oral and maxillofacial medicine and its related areas to clinicians, teachers and researchers concerned with the application of this information for the benefit of patients. JOMR publishes original scientific articles, literature reviews, and clinical case reports, proceedings of pertinent symposia or conferences and information for dentists, oral pathologists and maxillofacial surgeons, other specialists of medicine and public health. Original articles are considered for publication on the condition they have not been published or submitted for publication elsewhere.

2. ETHICAL GUIDELINES

JOMR adheres to the below ethical guidelines for publication and research.


2.1. Authorship

Authors submitting a paper do so on the understanding that the article have been read and approved by all authors and that all authors agree to the submission of the article to the Journal. All named authors must have made an active contribution to the conception and design and/or analysis and interpretation of the data and/or the drafting of the paper and all must have critically reviewed its content and have approved the final version submitted for publication. Participation solely in the acquisition of funding or the collection of data does not justify authorship.

JOMR adheres to the definition of authorship set up by The International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE). According to the ICMJE authorship criteria should be based on 1) substantial contributions to conception and design of, or acquisition of data or analysis and interpretation of data, 2) drafting the article or revising it critically for important intellectual content and 3) final approval of the version to be published. Authors should meet conditions 1, 2 and 3.


2.2. Ethical Approvals

a) Experimentation involving human subjects

Experimentation involving human subjects will only be published if such research has been conducted in full accordance with ethical principles, including the World Medical Association Declaration of Helsinki (http://www.wma.net/en/30publications/10policies/b3/) and the additional requirements, if any, of the country where the research has been carried out. Articles must be accompanied by a statement that the experiments were undertaken with the understanding and written consent of each subject and according to the above mentioned principles. A statement regarding the fact that the study has been independently reviewed and approved by an ethical board should also be included. Editor reserve the right to reject papers if there are doubts as to whether appropriate procedures have been used.

Example:

"All participants have read and signed informed consent form. The use of human subjects in this study has been reviewed and approved by the Health Science Institutional Review Board (IRB) of the University of New York.

b) Experimentation involving animals

When experimental animals are used the methods section must clearly indicate that adequate measures were taken to minimize pain or discomfort. Experiments should be carried out in accordance with the Guidelines laid down by the National Institute of Health (NIH) in the USA regarding the care and use of animals for experimental procedures or with the European Communities Council Directive of 24 November 1986 (86/609/EEC) and in accordance with local laws and regulations.

Example:

"The experimental protocol was approved by the Animals Experiments Committee of the Catholic University of Leuven".


2.3. Clinical Trials

Clinical trials should be reported using the CONSORT guidelines available at www.consort-statement.org. A CONSORT checklist should also be included in the submission material.

JOMR encourages authors submitting articles reporting from a clinical trial to register the trials in any of the following free, public clinical trials registries: www.clinicaltrials.gov, http://apps.who.int/trialsearch, http://isrctn.org/. The clinical trial registration number and name of the trial register will then be published with the paper.


2.4. Acknowledgments and Disclosure

a) Acknowledgments

At the end of the study, acknowledgments may be made to individuals who contributed to the research or the article preparation at a level that did not qualify for authorship. This may include technical help or participation in a clinical study. Authors are responsible for obtaining written permission from persons listed by name.

b) Disclosure statement

Possible conflict(s) of interests should be revealed. Authors are required to disclose all sources of institutional, private and corporate financial support for their study. Suppliers of materials (for free or at a discount from current rates) should be named in the source of funding and their location (town, state/county, country) included. Other suppliers will be identified in the text. If no funding has been available other than that of the author's institution, this should be specified upon submission. Authors are also required to disclose any potential conflict of interest. These include financial interests (for example patent, ownership, stock ownership, consultancies, speaker's fee,) or provision of study materials by their manufacturer for free or at a discount from current rates. Author's conflict of interest (or information specifying the absence of conflicts of interest) and the sources of funding for the research will be published under a separate heading entitled: "ACKNOWLEDGMENTS AND DISCLOSURE STATEMENTS".

Example:

1. Acknowledgments to individuals who contributed to the research or the article preparation: "The authors wish to thank Prof. Dr. P. Peterson for his assistance in digitizing radiographs and analyzing marginal bone-level changes and Prof. Dr. G. Wakens for his contribution in recruiting and referring patients".

2. If there are no conflicts of interests: "The authors report no conflicts of interest related to this study", or "No external funding, apart from the support of the authors' institution, was available for this study".

3. If there was institutional, private and corporate financial support for the study: "Supported by NH-NIDCR grants DE 13076, DE14269, and the ITI Foundation for the Promotion of Oral Implantology, Basel Switzerland (Grant Number 284/2003)".


2.5. Appeal of Decision

The decision on a paper is final and cannot be appealed.


2.6. Permissions and Waivers

a) Permissions

Permission of author and publisher must be obtained for the direct use of material (text, photos, and drawings) under copyright that does not belong to the author.

b) Waivers

Waivers must be obtained for photographs showing persons. When such waivers are not supplied, faces will be masked to prevent identification.

Permissions and waivers should be emailed along with the Mandatory Submission Form to the Editorial Assistant.


2.7. Mandatory Submission Form

(download MANDATORY SUBMISSION FORM)

Authors submitting a paper do so on the understanding that the work and its essential substance have not been published before and is not being considered for publication elsewhere. The submission of the article by the authors means that the authors automatically agree to assign copyright to JOMR if and when the article is accepted for publication. The articles published in this journal are protected by copyright, which covers translation rights and the exclusive right to reproduce and distribute all of the articles printed in the journal.

The Mandatory Submission Form, which can be found on the website, should be signed by all authors, scanned and emailed to Editorial Assistant (info@ejomr.org).

Multiple forms are acceptable. Assignment of the copyright is a condition of article publication.


2.8. Anti-Plagiarism Policy

JOMR has a very strict anti-plagiarism policy. It is an illegal form of copying and a serious offence. The academic work is supposed to be original and thus should be published only once.

Examples of plagiarism:

- Copying and pasting from the Internet and posting somewhere else without proper citation;

- Putting your name on another person’s essay or project;

- Copying exact wording from another person’s text;

- Using another person’s photo, diagram, tables, sounds, or ideas without proper citation;

- Presenting research in your own words without providing references;

- Purchasing another person’s text and using it as your own;

- Presenting ideas in the same format and order as your research source;

By submitting article to JOMR, Authors and Co-authors certify that:

- Authors are fully aware that plagiarism is illegal and wrong and authors know that plagiarism is the use of another person’s idea or published work and to pretend that it is one’s own.

- Authors declare that each contribution to their article or project has been acknowledged and source of information from other peoples’ published or unpublished works have been cited referenced.

- Author(s) certify that they/you are solely responsible for text of the article and work included in the article along with any incomplete reference.

- Authors are fully aware that plagiarism is illegal and wrong and authors know that plagiarism is the use of another person’s idea or published work and to pretend that it is one’s own.

- Authors declare that each contribution to their article or project has been acknowledged and source of information from other peoples’ published or unpublished works have been cited referenced.

- Author(s) certify that they/you are solely responsible for text of the article and work included in the article along with any incomplete reference.


2.9. Copyright and Permissions

All the content published by JOMR is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 Unported License (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0):
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/.

Therefore, the authors retain the copyright of their original work, but agree to license their work according CC BY-NC-ND 3.0. This license permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work and is properly cited. The copyright, license information and link to the original publication on (http://www.ejomr.org) must be included.

3. SUBMISSION OF ARTICLES

3.1. Article Submission Online

Articles should be uploaded as Microsoft PC-Word file with tables and figures included at the end of the document. The filename must be typed exactly as "text.doc". Before attempting to insert a figure or illustration, its file size should be checked and reduced if necessary. Inserting an overly large figure file can cause the file upload procedure to fail. For review purposes, a figure file does not need to be larger than 500 Kbytes. We suggest that you attempt to keep the total file size of your word document below 4 Mbytes. This may require you to reduce the file size of your figures using an image application. Maximum file size is 15 Mbytes. No paper version is required. High quality images must be presented in separate files assigning filenames formed including figures numbers (e.g., Figure 1.jpg, Figure 2.tif, Figure 3.png, Figure 4.psd) even if the figures are included in your article file.

Original articles are considered for publication on the condition that they have not been published or submitted for publication elsewhere.

The publisher reserves the right to edit articles to fit the space available and to ensure conciseness, clarity, and stylistic consistency, subject to the author's final approval.

Articles are reviewed and selected in a blinded process by editors and appropriate content experts. Therefore, it is important that submitted articles and illustrations do not contain information that will identify the origin of the paper (except for the title page, which will not be sent to the reviewers).

Important: In order to facilitate review process author should suggest the names and current email addresses of one or few potential international reviewers whom author considers to be capable of reviewing article. In addition to authors choice the journal editor will choose one or two reviewers as well.

After submission author will receive an e-mail to confirm receipt of article. If author do not receive the confirmation email after 24 hours he should check his e-mail address carefully in the system and contact JOMR Assistant Editor (info@ejomr.org).


3.2. Internet-Based Peer Review Process

Once new article are received, Editorial office will create PDF file version of new article. Also, the article/correspondent details are entered into the system database, by the editorial assistant.

The Editor-in-Chief and/or Associate Editors will then select a number (at least 2) of reviewers who are authorities in the field and who are deemed to have the relevant experience and expertise to provide a full and cogent review of the article. A copy of the title and abstract is made available to them to assist them in deciding whether they have the pertinent experience to review the article. If they accept the assignment to review, they will receive original article and further details. After that they must Log-In to the database, where they will submit to their comments.

Reviewers are allocated 6 weeks for evaluation of submitted article. An automatic e-mail Letter of Reminder is sent after 5 weeks by the system database if the review has not been returned.

When the reviews are returned to the editorial office they are forwarded to an Associate Editor, who will then make a recommendation.

The Editor-in-Chief will then make a final decision based on this recommendation. The corresponding author is contacted via e-mail with the decision and reviewers' reports. The reviewers are informed of the decision and are sent a copy of the other reviewers' reports for their information.

Revised articles follow a similar procedure. Upon resubmission, the Editor-in-Chief or Associate Editor evaluates the revision and decides whether it can be accepted or whether it is to be sent to the same external reviewers who undertook the initial evaluation. Reviewers are allocated a maximum of 2 weeks for the second review of resubmitted articles.

Important: All corrections in resubmitted articles (Microsoft PC-Word file) should be done in blue color, in order that reviewers and editor could focus only on those areas where author have made the changes.

4. ARTICLE TYPES ACCEPTED

4.1. Original Articles

Original evidence-based research articles of high scientific merit in the field of clinical oral and maxillofacial rehabilitation and physiology. Also original research articles related with basic aspects of oral and maxillofacial rehabilitation, e.g. in vitro and laboratory studies.

Original Research Articles must describe novel and significant observations and provide sufficient detail so that the findings can be critically evaluated and, if necessary, repeated.


4.2. Literature Reviews

These are focused reviews of basic and clinical science related to oral and maxillofacial pathology. These reviews should be concise and address an important and timely clinical question. The review should be based on a critical assessment of the literature, and may include data or examples from the research or clinical experience of the author(s). Authors should discuss clinical relevance and future projections. Reviews should take a broad view of the field rather than merely summarizing the authors own previous work, so extensive citation of the authors own publications is discouraged. At-large submissions will be considered, but authors should contact the Editor-in-Chief before developing an article to avoid duplicating a topic already in preparation. Papers should be balanced, literature-based reviews. Articles should be written at a level instructive to Journal readers. For example, clear definitions of abbreviations and a glossary of terms may be useful for defining highly technical or new terminology. Since critical reviews require selection of reports and interpretation of data, authors should not have a financial interest in the companies making products or providing services described in the review.


4.3. Case Reports

These papers report a sufficient number of consecutive or randomized cases to make a persuasive argument for or against the procedure, technique, or concept under discussion. Cases should be relatively homogeneous so that a systematic evaluation of one type of disease, lesion, or condition is made for the procedure under consideration. Also, treatment and documentation should be consistent and standardized for all cases. It is recognized that definitive evidence for the safety and efficacy of any procedure, drug, or device comes primarily from well-designed, randomized, controlled trials. However, well-executed case series may lead to hypotheses about the usefulness of new and innovative procedures, drugs, or devices and may therefore be of value to the progress of clinical science. They may be followed by commentaries, or a review on state of art of the clinical problem addressed in the case report. Concise literature relevant to the case should be included. Figures, where necessary, should be targeted to illustrate the text, but should be limited in number.

5. ARTICLE PREPARATION

The journal will follow as much as possible the recommendations of the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (Vancouver Group) in regard to preparation of articles and authorship (Uniform requirements for articles submitted to biomedical journals. Ann Intern Med 1997;126:36-47). See http://www.icmje.org.


Language

The language of publication is British English. Authors for whom English is a second language might choose to have their article professionally edited by an English speaking person before submission to make sure the English is of high quality. Articles which are not written in fluent English will be rejected automatically without refereeing.


Abbreviations, symbols and nomenclature

The symbol % is to be used for percent, h for hour, and min for minute and s for second. In vitro, in vivo, in situ and other Latin expressions are to be italicized. Use only standard abbreviations. All units will be metric. Use no roman numerals in the text. In decimals, a decimal point and not a comma will be used. Avoid abbreviations in the title. The full term for which an abbreviation stands should precede its first use in the text unless it is a standard unit of measurement. In cases of doubt, the spelling orthodoxy of Webster's new international dictionary will be adhered to. Individual teeth should be identified full name or using the FDI two-digit system.


Scientific names

Proper names of bacteria should be binomial and should be italicized. The full proper name (e.g., Streptococcus sanguis) must be given upon first mention. The generic name may be abbreviated thereafter with the first letter of the genus (e.g., S. sanguis). If abbreviation of the generic name could cause confusion, the full name should be used. If the vernacular form of a genus name (e.g., streptococci) is used, the first letter of the vernacular name is not capitalized and the name is not italicized. Use of two letters of the genus (e.g., Ps. for Peptostreptococcus) is incorrect, even though it might avoid ambiguity. With regard to drugs, generic names should be used instead of proprietary names. If a proprietary name is used, it must be attached when the term is first used.


Trade names

Generic terms are to be used whenever possible, but trade names and manufacturer name, city, state, and country should be included parenthetically at first mention.


Statistics

Statistical methods should be described such that a knowledgeable reader with access to the original data could verify the results. Wherever possible, results should be quantified and appropriate indicators of measurement error or uncertainty given. Sole reliance on statistical hypothesis testing or normalization of data should be avoided. Data in as close to the original form as reasonable should be presented. Details about eligibility criteria for subjects, randomization, and methods for blinding of observations, treatment complications, and numbers of observations should be included. Losses to observations, such as dropouts from a clinical trial, should be indicated. General-use computer programs should be listed. Statistical terms, abbreviations, and symbols should be defined.


Headings and subheading

For the headings and subheadings use the following text decorations:

FIRST HEADING: UPPERCASE, BOLD

First level subheading: Bold

Second level subheading: Bold, italic

Example:

MATERIAL AND METHODS

Guidelines to identify mandibular vital structures

Mandibular canal region

In some cases, you may need "third level," even "fourth level," subheadings (the main subheading being the "first level") then use the following:

Third level subheading: Normal

Fourth subheading: Italic


Structure

Article Material should appear in the following order:

1. Title Page

2. Abstract and Keywords

3. Text with requiring section;

4. Acknowledgments and Disclosure statements

5. References

6. Tables

7. Figures (should not be embedded in the article)

8. Figure Legends


NOTE: authors should retain a copy of their article for their own records.

5.1. Original Articles Format and Structure

(download ORIGINAL ARTICLE TEMPLATE)

Article format and structure. Articles should be typed in a 12-point font and double-spaced with a 2.5 mm margin all around. Number all pages.

Title page. Page 1 should include the title of the article (descriptive but as concise as possible) and the full name(s), of the authors and institutional affiliation(s). Fax, email address, and complete mailing address must also be provided for the corresponding author.

Abstract/Keywords. Page 2 should include a maximum 250-word structured abstract the following four headings:

  1. Objectives (no abbreviations);
  2. Material and Methods;
  3. Results;
  4. Conclusions (no abbreviations).

A maximum of six keywords or short phrases, drawn from MeSH documentation, to facilitate indexing should be listed below the abstract in alphabetical order. Medical subjects heading is available on http://www.nlm.nih.gov/mesh/meshhome.html using MeSH Browser:
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/mesh/MBrowser.html

INTRODUCTION. Summarize the rationale and purpose of the study, giving only pertinent references. Clearly state the working hypothesis.

MATERIAL AND METHODS. This section lists the methods used in the study in sufficient detail so that other investigators would be able to reproduce the research. When established methods are used, the author need only refer to previously published reports; however, the authors should provide brief descriptions of methods that are not well known or that have been modified. Identify all drugs and chemicals used, including both generic and, if necessary, proprietary names and doses. The populations for research involving humans should be clearly defined and enrolment dates provided.

Clinical trials should be reported using the CONSORT guidelines available at www.consort-statement.org. It should be described four stages of a trial:

1. Enrolment;

2. Intervention allocation;

3. Follow-up;

4. Analysis.

You can use a CONSORT flow diagram. A CONSORT checklist should also be included in the submission material.

JOMR encourages authors submitting articles reporting from a clinical trial to register the trials in any of the following free, public clinical trials registries: http://isrctn.org/, www.clinicaltrials.gov,
http://www.ifpma.org/tag/clinical-trials/.
The clinical trial registration number and name of the trial register will then be published with the paper.

Statistical analysis (subsection)

Indicate the statistical methods used, if applicable. Include the short description of Mean (SD) e.g. "Parametric data were expressed as mean and standard deviation (M [SD]). Statistical significance level was defined at P = 0.05."

RESULTS. Present results in a logical sequence in the text, tables, and illustrations. Do not repeat in the text all the data in the tables or illustrations; emphasize only important observations.

DISCUSSION. Emphasize the new and important aspects of the study and the conclusions that follow from them. Do not repeat in detail data or other material given in the Introduction or Results section. Relate observations to other relevant studies and point out the implications of the findings and their limitations.

CONCLUSIONS. Link the conclusions with the goals of the study but avoid unqualified statements and conclusions not adequately supported by the data. In particular, authors should avoid making statements on economic benefits and costs unless their article includes the appropriate economic data and analyses. Avoid claiming priority and alluding to work that has not been completed. New hypotheses can be stated when warranted, but should be clearly labelled as such (no abbreviations).

5.2. Literature Reviews Format and Structure

(download LITERATURE REVIEW TEMPLATE)

Article format and structure. Articles should be typed in a 12-point font and double-spaced with a 2.5 mm margin all around. Number all pages.

Title page. Page 1 should include the title of the article (descriptive but as concise as possible) and the full name(s), of the authors and institutional affiliation(s). Fax, email address, and complete mailing address must also be provided for the corresponding author.

Abstract/Keywords should be typed on Page 2.

The abstract should summarize the main conclusions of the review in no more than 250-word and the following four headings:

  1. Objectives (no abbreviations);
  2. Material and Methods;
  3. Results;
  4. Conclusions (no abbreviations).

A maximum of six keywords or short phrases, drawn from MeSH documentation, to facilitate indexing should be listed below the abstract in alphabetical order. Medical subjects heading is available on: http://www.nlm.nih.gov/mesh/meshhome.html using MeSH Browser:
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/mesh/MBrowser.html

INTRODUCTION. A question or series of related questions to be addressed should be given; rationales for asking these questions and why the questions are timely should be explained.

MATERIAL AND METHODS. The method of reviewing the literature should be discussed (e.g., bibliographic indexes and databases used, limits on years covered by the search, languages searched, and other important information regarding the search process should be described). For comprehensive or systematic literature review we recommend to follow PRISMA Statement: http://www.prisma-statement.org/PRISMAStatement/

You can use templates of the PRISMA flow diagram and PRISMA 2009 Checklist. You should include following information:

  1. Protocol and registration if exists;
  2. Eligibility criteria;
  3. Information sources;
  4. Search;
  5. Study selection;
  6. Data collection process;
  7. Data items;
  8. Risk of bias in individual studies;
  9. Summary measures;
  10. Synthesis of results;
  11. Risk of bias across studies;
  12. Additional analyses.

Look at PRISMA flow diagram and PRISMA 2009 Checklist for more details: http://www.prisma-statement.org/PRISMAStatement/

RESULTS. A sequence of logical subsections that reflect the area being reviewed should be developed. This section should be a critical analysis of the literature, including arguments needed to support the conclusions reached; why certain papers not meeting well described critical standards, such as randomized clinical trials, were not used as evidence; and what issues remain unresolved and need further study. Evidence tables are often useful in summarizing reviewed literature, and various statistical analyses appropriate to reviewing literature, such as meta-analysis, should be considered.

DISCUSSION. Summarize the main findings including the strength of evidence for each main outcome; consider their relevance to key groups (e.g., healthcare providers, users, and policy makers). Discuss limitations at study and outcome level (e.g., risk of bias), and at review-level (e.g., incomplete retrieval of identified research, reporting bias).

CONCLUSIONS. Link the conclusions with the goals of the study but avoid unqualified statements and conclusions not adequately supported by the data. In particular, authors should avoid making statements on economic benefits and costs unless their article includes the appropriate economic data and analyses. Avoid claiming priority and alluding to work that has not been completed. New hypotheses can be stated when warranted, but should be clearly labelled as such (no abbreviations).

5.3. Case Reports Format and Structure

(download CASE REPORT TEMPLATE)

Article format and structure. Articles should be typed in a 12-point font and double-spaced with a 2.5 mm margin all around. Number all pages.

Title page. Page 1 should include the title of the article (descriptive but as concise as possible) and the full name(s), of the authors and institutional affiliation(s). Fax, email address, and complete mailing address must also be provided for the corresponding author.

Abstract/Keywords should be typed on Page 2.

Case Reports and Case Series should be submitted with a structured abstract, consisting of no more than 250-word and the following four paragraphs:

  1. Background. Describes the clinical situation being discussed (no abbreviations).
  2. Methods. Describes the clinical procedures (surgical and non-surgical) performed.
  3. Results. Describes the clinical results.
  4. Conclusions. Reports what authors have concluded, specifically clinical implications in practice situations (no abbreviations).

A maximum of six keywords or short phrases, drawn from MeSH documentation, to facilitate indexing should be listed below the abstract in alphabetical order. Medical subjects heading is available on: http://www.nlm.nih.gov/mesh/meshhome.html using MeSH Browser:
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/mesh/MBrowser.html

INTRODUCTION. This section should include a critical review of the pertinent literature.

CASE DESCRIPTION AND RESULTS. This section describes the case or cases, including all relevant data. For ease of presentation, tables describing longitudinal data in a chronological form may be useful. Carefully selected, high-quality clinical photographs in full colour, as well as radiographs, are encouraged.

DISCUSSION. This should include findings, put into perspective with respect to the field and literature. Unique arguments and new information gained should be summarized. Consideration of the clinical significance of the case(s) should be emphasized in all sections.

CONCLUSIONS. Link the conclusions with the goals of the study but avoid unqualified statements and conclusions not adequately supported by the data. In particular, authors should avoid making statements on economic benefits and costs unless their article includes the appropriate economic data and analyses. Avoid claiming priority and alluding to work that has not been completed. New hypotheses can be stated when warranted, but should be clearly labelled as such (no abbreviations).

5.4. Acknowledgments and Disclosure Statements

a) Acknowledgments

At the end of the Discussion, acknowledgments may be made to individuals who contributed to the research or the article preparation at a level that did not qualify for authorship. This may include technical help or participation in a clinical study. Authors are responsible for obtaining written permission from persons listed by name. Read more in chapter 2.4.

b) Disclosure Statement

Possible conflict(s) of interests should be revealed. Read more in chapter 2.4.

5.5. References

  1. All references given must be cited in the text, numbered in order of appearance in square brackets, e.g. [1]; [2,4,7] or [2-5]. The reference list should be double-spaced at the end of the article in numeric sequence.
  2. Please, delete all footnotes as references in article.
  3. Do not include unpublished data or personal communications in the reference list. Cite such references parenthetically in the text and include a date.
  4. Avoid using abstracts as reference.
  5. We would greatly appreciate if you could append a "[Medline: 24421983]" (where 24421983 is the PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE) at the end of a reference. This speeds up our copyediting/typesetting process and prevents citation errors.
  6. You may (in particular for references not listed in PubMed) add the DOI at the end of the reference (e.g. [doi: 10.5037/jomr.2011.2101]). The DOI is a unique identifier which is published by most journals somewhere within the article. You may check whether a DOI is correct using the DOI resolver at http://dx.doi.org/.
  7. Provide complete information for each reference, including names of all authors. Do not use "et al." to abbreviate authors. If the reference is to part of a book, also include the title of the chapter (or part) and names of the book's editor(s).
  8. Journal reference style should be based on Vancouver system and on "Uniform requirements for articles submitted to biomedical journals" (JAM 1997; 277:927-34, http://www.nlm.nih.gov/bsd/uniform_requirements.html).

Examples:

1. Standard journal article:

Juodzbalys G. Instrument for extraction socket measurement in immediate implant installation. Clin Oral Implants Res. 2003 Apr;14(2):144-9. [Medline: 12656872] [doi: 10.1034/j.1600-0501.2003.140202.x]


2. Journal article on the Internet:

Juodzbalys G, Wang HL, Sabalys G. Injury of the Inferior Alveolar Nerve during Implant Placement: a Literature Review. J Oral Maxillofac Res. 2011 Apr 1;2(1):e1. [URL: http://www.ejomr.org/JOMR/archives/2011/1/e1/v2n1e1ht.htm] [Medline: 24421983] [PMC free article: 3886063] [doi: 10.5037/jomr.2011.2101]


3. Chapter in a book.

Meltzer PS, Kallioniemi A, Trent JM. Chromosome alterations in human solid tumors. In: Vogelstein B, Kinzler KW, editors. The genetic basis of human cancer. New York: McGraw-Hill; 2002. p. 93-113.


4. Conference proceedings:

Harnden P, Joffe JK, Jones WG, editors. Germ cell tumours V. Proceedings of the 5th Germ Cell Tumour Conference; 2001 Sep 13-15; Leeds, UK. New York: Springer; 2002.


Note: If conference proceedings are available through Medline, please use the Medline citation rather than the style above - for example in case of AMIA proceedings or IMIA proceedings (=Medinfo) the citation is as follows:

Mandl KD, Kohane IS. Healthconnect: clinical grade patient-physician communication. Proc AMIA Symp 1999;(1-2):849-53.

Hachem F, Bellet J, Flory A, Leverve X. A generic model for Internet-accessed databases in epidemiology: a nutritional application. Medinfo 1998;9 Pt 2:1310-3.


5. Article not in English:

Ellingsen AE, Wilhelmsen I. Sykdomsangst blant medisin- og jusstudenter. Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2002;122(8):785-7. Norwegian.


6. Dissertation:

Borkowski MM. Infant sleep and feeding: a telephone survey of Hispanic Americans [dissertation]. Mount Pleasant (MI): Central Michigan University; 2002.

5.6. Tables and Figures

  1. All tables and figures should be numbered and cited in the text in order of appearance.
  2. All tables and figures should be grouped at the end of the text in the same Microsoft PC-Word file.
  3. All figures should be uploaded separately with the article during the submission.

a) Tables

Tables should be numbered consecutively with Arabic numerals (Table 1) in the order of their appearance in the text. A brief descriptive title should be supplied for each. Explanations, including abbreviations, should be listed as footnotes, not in the heading. Every column should have a heading. For each row should be created a new table row, rather than writing multiple rows into one cell. Do not use internal horizontal or vertical rules.

Statistical measures of variations such as standard deviation or standard error of the mean should be included as appropriate in the footnotes.

b) Figures

All figures should clarify the text and their number should be kept to a minimum. All pictures should be referenced in the text using parentheses (e.g. Figure 1; Figures 2A and 2B; Figure 3A-C).Details must be large enough to retain their clarity after reduction in size. Each figure should have a legend. All illustrations must be the highest quality! Please submit all graphics as separate files or send via email info@ejomr.org.

Preparation of Electronic Figures for Publication

Illustrative figures should also be uploaded as separate (supplementary) high resolution and quality files, even if the figures are included in your article file. The file names should contain the number of the figure (e.g., Figure 1.jpg, Figure 2.tif, Figure 3.png, Figure 4.psd).

5.7. Figure Legends

Figure legends should be grouped at the end of the text on a separate sheet. Detailed captions are encouraged. Legends should be typed double-spaced with Arabic numbers corresponding to the figure. When arrows, symbols, numbers, or letters are used, explain each clearly in the legend; also explain internal scale, original magnification, and method of staining as appropriate. Panel labels should be in capital letters. Legends should not appear on the same page as the actual figures.